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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Sutter Creek, California, United States

May 20, 2011 - Plymouth, CA

May 20 – 22, 2011 Far Horizons 49er Village; Plymouth, CA Our RV park is in Plymouth, (formerly Puckerville, Pokerville, and Poker Camp) in Amador County’s rolling foothills. This is the heart of the mother lode with 20 miles of gold mines running from Plymouth through Drytown, Amador City, Sutter Creek and Jackson. We visited Fiddletown, once a booming trade center for the area’s mining camps. Today not so much as the only occupied storefront on Main Street was a library. The historic district is in a viewable state of arrested decay but...

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Jan 26, 2011 - Endless Driving

No new photos today folks! Almost the whole day was endless driving through the mountains. We lost our internet connection for directions and took a couple of wrong turns trying to find Sutter Creek. And then when we finally did find it, the mine was closed! But they directed us to a cave a few miles away and we said hey, we got nothing better to do so off we went, only to get lost again! So then it was time to take a break and eat lunch, which luckily we had planned for in advance. Our cooler was stocked with deli meat that had NO CORN,...

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Oct 9, 2010 - Gold Country

Oct 9, 2010 Saturday Today we are headed off to go antiquing in Amador City and Sutter Creek. We are taking 2 cars because Mike and I are then having dinner with his sister Cindy, her boyfriend Pete and her son, Blaze. Our first stop is in Drytown, the oldest community in Amador County, and the first in which gold was discovered, was named for the creek which runs dry every summer. However, it was certainly not "dry", as stories tell of there being up to 26 saloons, of which just one remains, The Drytown Club. It has several restaurants,...

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Oct 18, 2008 - After the Goldrush

Hired a car for a weekend tour of the 'gold country' - a series of goldrush communities situated along Highway 50. The rock in the area still retains 80% of the precious material which is uneconomical to extract. Undeterred and with enthusiasm probably not seen since the 1850's rush to the area by people from around the world, we panned in the south fork of the American River just opposite the spot where James Marshall found the nugget that triggered one of the biggest human migrations in history. An hour later all we could show for our...

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