Explore...

Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Falmouth, England, United Kingdom

Feb 12, 2014 - Lands end to St Ives

Unfortunately the museum and cable station at The Lizard were closed due to winter and the poor weather. On around to Lands’ end – and it definitely felt like the wind was right off the North Pole where our eyes were spontaneously watering trying to keep our eyeballs wet and our fingers were in the third stage of hypothermia before we had even reached the edge of the coast where the sign post is…!! Yep, have photos to prove as I couldn’t see a thing! Pete had told us about the tin mines along the coast heading NE from Lands’ end and we...

Jump to full entry

Jul 19, 2013 - Falmouth & a low-flying pigeon

Didn't expect to be here in beautiful semi-tropical Falmouth tonight because we were thinking we'd be staying in Truro, Cornwall. However, we found ourselves spat out on the south side of Truro (by our unerringly accurate GPS instructions) so thought we'd look for somewhere to stay on the south side and the next minute we were in Falmouth. Everything is so close together here and our map is of such a large scale that we always find it surprising how quickly we arrive somewhere. We're also using a road atlas, 'Philip's Navigator Britain',...

Jump to full entry

May 7, 2013 - Saint Michael's Mount

Falmouth is the largest city in Cornwall, the region hanging out from the southeastern English coast like a tail. Mining used to be the way most locals made a living; these days it is the tourists that get mined. It is surprising that cruise ships stop here since the harbor is not up to housing us. Just like our last visit, we had a twenty minute tender ride to shore. But the locals make us feel so welcome. They line the piers and shores, loaded down with friendly smiles, maps, brochures and tourist info. The sunshine and blue skies felt...

Jump to full entry

Sep 4, 2010 - land's end

Falmouth is in Cornwall, at the far southwestern tip of England. Its climate is far milder than its latitude would suggest, because the Gulf Current brings warmth (and tar balls?) from the Gulf of Mexico. Many of the lush plants we saw growing here would be just as happy in the Carolinas in the US. Sir Walter Raleigh, a pirate who plundered with the royal blessing, was one of many who took advantage of the deep waters and many inlets. Smugglers also made a great living here, importing goods without having to pay customs fees. Since Roman...

Jump to full entry


Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com