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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Sardegna, Italy

Sep 29, 2018 - Last day in Sardinia

Today we travelled northwest visiting the towns of Sassari and Alghero. On the way our guide gave us more information about the economy of Sardinia. In the past the ranking in importance was sheep, agriculture and tourism but that order has now been reversed. The sheep are farmed in the hills through which we passed a couple of days ago and are milked to make cheese and shorn for their wool. That wool is now bringing ing just 8 cents per kilo and even then not all can be sold so the farmers have to pay to dispose of it. Olives are a better...

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Sep 28, 2018 - Sailing in the archipelago.

Today was one of those delightful surprises which make a trip special. Our bus took us north from Olbia along the coast road,through small towns which are mainly tourist towns, to Palau which is the harbour for the archipelago. Quickly found our yacht, walked the gangplank, removed our shoes and settled down for a day in the care of Marco and Dennis, two young men who sailed, cooked, chatted and generally looked after us. Motored out then they set the sails and we enjoyed calm sea and remarkably blue waters. Many other yachts out but not...

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Sep 27, 2018 - Fonni to Olbia

Last night held a couple of surprises. Our hotel was a ski lodge so my room had four beds, some had six. Our meal was plentiful and designed for après ski appetites. An antipasti platter per person held four different meats, tow cheeses plus grilled veg and olives. Next course very ample servings of pasta of two varieties, next course suckling pig, wild boar and potatoes, next course two very light pastries holding cheese. Then came a serve of a home made drink - choice of grappa or a mint flavoured fortified wine. Then an invitation to the...

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Sep 26, 2018 - Cagliari to Fonni

Heading north from Cagliari we passed through small villages. Two of these were pointed out by our driver Martello as special for their murals, sculptures and houses painted in a variety of colours and with well,kept gardens. About forty k on we reached the site of a nuraghe, a term meaning heap,of stones but this was no little pile of stones. Discovered only in the 1950's it revealed a complex structure built with stones by the Nuragic people who lived between 1800-200 B.C. And then they disappeared. Various theories but one favoured one...

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Sep 25, 2018 - Cagliari

Cagliari, the capital city of Sardinia was our focus today and also the focus of two large cruise ships in the harbour so some sites were very crowded. Cagliari is built on seven hills and our first stop was to view the city from a height looking one way to the city buildings, the other way toward the lagoon which used to be used for salt harvesting but is now a haven for water birds. The Archaeological Museum is in a relatively new complex of museums including one of the art of Siam (Thailand) and a museum of wax anatomical models dating...

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Sep 24, 2018 - Nora and the S.W. coast

Today we headed to Nora an archaeological site about 40 k south west of Cagliari. The site was discovered only in 1951. It is situated on a peninsula with three different bays so would have been ideal for shipping and shelter and it was here that the Phoenicians and then the Romans established settlements. Over time with the encroaching sea destroying buildings and sand blowing the site was completely covered. Today a number of archaeological teams from various Italian universities were working uncovering areas and collecting the dirt and...

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Sep 23, 2018 - A day of heights and on to Sardinia

Another full day and now we have arrived in Sardinia. This morning we set off to be at the site of a Doric Temple in Segesta an archaeological site outside Palermo. The temple was never finished and was only started because the local people had appealed to Athens for help in a conflict with Siracusa and the temple was started to impress the Athenians. They in turn were quite happy to help as they were interested in gaining Siracusa. The twenty years of work begun BC remain today and nearby is a Roman Ampitheatre built high in the hills. We...

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Sep 10, 2018 - Alghero

Drove to Alghero after stopping in Sassari for a few hours. Lots of fields along the way, vineyards, hay fields, pine trees with pine nuts. Both cities are well maintained. We are seeing more African migrants than we did in Corsica. It is pretty hot today, we are cooking. Tuesday - we toured the old Town this morning. The old fort, a couple of churches and some Nuraghe ruins that were 4000 years old. Around the old town were photos of citizens over 100 years of age. We included a copy of one on a bike. We had a great guide who kept us...

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Italian Islands 2018

Sep 9, 2018 - Castelsardo, Sardinia, Italy

We traveled south to Bonifacio to catch a ferry (before we experienced severe withdrawal symptoms). Had a nice sailing and upon arrival, we stopped for paninis, and then continued on to Castelsardo. Castelsardo is a picturesque town with a castle at the top. Nice hike to the top. Sardinia has lots of cultivated fields whereas Corsica was mostly uncultivated.

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Italian Islands 2018

Apr 26, 2018 - Caligari, Sardinia – Italy’s southern Island

Today is another Mediterranean Island, Sardinia. Much bigger than Malta at 150 miles long and 60 miles wide. Just a tad smaller than Sicily. It too has along history of many conquers (or Conqueeries as our guide says) over the past thousands of years. Official languages are Italian and Sardo (Don’t call it a dialect). The city is built mostly from the local white limestone but is much more colorful than Malta was. We are just doing the included tour, Caligari Panorama. Bus tour of the town, stopping at the Basilica of Our Lady of Bonaria...

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Apr 26, 2018 - Cagliari, Sardinia Italy

History: Cagliari the capital of Sardinia and the city that was carved out of limestone actually gleams in the Sardinia sun. One fifth of Sardinia’s land is used for agriculture producing tomatoes, Artichokes, citrus fruits, olives and wine. Cork oak trees are prevalent which is convenient for bottling wine and olive oil. Great little country with a fun capital. Streets are paved in cobblestone and so small one car can barely pass through them, full of shops, restaurants and sweet shops. Flamingos live here year around so wonderful, loved...

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Mar 5, 2018 - Cagliari: Sardinia

We zig-zagged our drive south to explore as much as possible of the Sardinian landscape and were well rewarded. The small towns and villages were always interesting but it was the countryside that had our attention. Not overly spectacular but green, undulating farmland with plenty of sheep and the ever present rocks. The main attraction of the drive was a slight detour to an excavation site at Tamuli to explore the remains of a stone village with it's ceremonial areas and tombs dating back to the Nuragic Age between 1900 and 730 BCE. We...

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the islands

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