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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Grand Pre, Nova Scotia, Canada

Jun 25, 2018 - Port Royal Habitation and Fort Anne

Our day began with a tour of the “Port Royal Habitation”. This is a 1939 reconstruction of the original 1605 french built fort like structure which was used as a trading post for trade with the Mi’Kmag, the native people of this region. This site is on the beautiful sheltered harbor of Port-Royal and is a very worthwhile stop on your travels. This region changed hands between the French and British several times over the centuries of 1600, 1700 and 1800 and leaves a confusing history to decifer. Even the Scots had a brief period of...

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Jun 24, 2018 - travel to annapolis royal, continued

24 June Todays drive of 175 miles south-westward to Annapolis Royal, NS., took us past Grand Pre which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, where we spent several hours learning about the Acadians, people from western France, who settled in this area in the 17th century. We learned about their culture and strife and their success in reclaiming tidal land from the sea creating a paradise for their people by building dikes and creating a method of controlling the tidal seawater flow. The Acadians tried to remain neutral in the many wars and...

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Sep 22, 2017 - Grand Pré

The campground I’m staying at is not far from the Grand Pré Historical site, just across the road from Evangeline Beach which is on the Bay of Fundy. Naturally, I’ve been watching the tides but you can’t just stay there & watch, you have to go back & forth to see the changes. When I went this morning, I thought the tide was out but it had already been coming in for nearly 3 hours. I checked the tide charts so was there for the high tide this afternoon. It was only a 14 metre tide today, below the maximum of 16 metres but it’s still 10 ft...

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Trip Journal


Canada 2017

Sep 21, 2017 - Annapolis Royal to Grand Pré

Today was all about the Acadians at Grand Pré National Historic Site, the Acadians’ most cherished historic location, mostly because of Longfellow’s poem, Evangeline. Most Acadians are descended from about 50 families who settled around the Port-Royal area between 1636 & 1650. While they were mainly of French origin, they included individuals of Basque, Spanish, Irish, Portuguese, English, Scottish or other European backgrounds. Some Acadians were also descended from marriages between French men & First Nations women but the thing that...

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Trip Journal


Canada 2017

May 26, 2017 - May 27-28

May 27 An overcast sky greeted us. We decided, after arranging to take the car in Monday morning to get the windshield wipers checked, to tour the Citadel. The Citadel is a large hill that has been the site of a fortification since the British established a military base in the 1750s. The current fort is an imposing stone structure built in the 1850s. We parked at the bottom of the hill and walked up an inclined path. Two athletic runners sprinted ahead of us - they were hoping to complete the climb five times. This is the same climb that...

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Trip Journal


Maritimes trip

Jul 14, 2015 - Grand Pre National Historic Site

Grand Pre National Historic Site is place where the largest deportation of French Acadiens took place during the French and Indian Wars. Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy were taken by the British from the French in the 2nd French and Indian War in 1713. In the 4th French and Indian War the British sought to neutralize the French settlers in Grand Pre by deporting them. Grand Pre was a prosperous and self-sufficient French community in the French Colony of Acadia. First settled in 1680, the settlers used skills from their homeland along the...

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Jul 5, 2013 - Grand Pre'

We car pooled to the Grand Pre' French Acadian Information Center approximately 50 miles from our campground. We sat through a film telling about when the French Acadian's arrived in 1680 and built this large settlement. They built these large dykes that are part of the 31,740 acres, under sea level to keep the ocean salt water out. With the victory of the British in Quebec City, the Acadians were forced out in 1755 because they would not go by the rules that the British demanded. They were told that everything except their personal...

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Sep 6, 2012 - Day 53 - to Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Our journey today took us again up the Annapolis Valley to the town of Wolfville and Grand Pre area. Wolfville is where Acadia University is ans is another beautiful little town. Grand Pre is part of Acadian history as it is where the Acadians were forced to leave 200+ years ago (1778 if I remember correctly)by the British as they wanted to remain neutral not pledge allegance to Britain or Americans. They had built a series of dikes to keep high Fundy tides out and use the land for agriculture. A new National Historic Site was opened there...

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Trip Journal


The Wandering Nunns

Aug 15, 2012 - Grand-Pre`

Road Trip!!!! Over the course of the past few days I seem to have gotten my strength back so it’s time for an adventure. I teamed up with my friends, Doc and Judy Weems, for a trip to Digby and Brier Island ~ the farthest point on the Nova Scotia coast. They are taking their RV so their faithful companion, Dizzy, can accompany them. I have opted to follow in my car. Our route will take us through the beautiful Annapolis Valley region and along the Bay of Fundy coast. Since it is a long drive and provincial roads are usually too rough for...

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Jul 19, 2010 - Grand Pré, NS - Land of Evangeline Camping

Our trip to Grand Pré was 123 miles of winding twisting roads up and down the hills of Nova Scotia. The roads were in good shape so it was really a nice ride, just slow. We are staying at the Land of Evangeline Family Camping campground which has large, full hookup, 30 amp, grassy sites but no WiFi so again this entry in the blog will be posted at a later date when we get internet access again. At least we do have much better cell service here than we did at Lower Five Islands and the satellite was an easy connection. We had to give the...

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Sep 24, 2008 - Hockey History & Giant Pumpkins

We continued along the coast highway this morning and it continued to be terribly rough and winding. It didn’t improve until we joined the highway coming up from Halifax. There was a nice picnic spot along the highway and right beside the bay where we stopped for lunch. The tide was way out and we saw lots of red mud flats and dry streams. We stopped in the small town of Windsor to visit the Hockey Heritage Museum. Ice hockey is believed to have originated in Windsor around 1800 when the boys of Canada’s first college, King’s College,...

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Sep 23, 2008 - Driving the Fundy Coast of NS

Tuesday 9/23/08 Driving the Fundy Coast of NS It is cool this morning; 44 degrees at 7:30am. It will remain cool throughout the day, reaching a high of 60 before starting to cool off again. We took a ride south in farm lands darting in and out of the coast to little fishing villages. This is along the Fundy coast where the tides can get as high as 50 feet. Today the high tide will be only 42 feet. When we visited harbors the tide is out which gives a dramatic view of the tide range with the boats sitting on the ground. The first place we...

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