Kapoor Year 14A: The Balkans travel blog

When We Learned That The Old Highway Ran 4km Along The Shore,...

We Were Essentially Retracing The First Part Of The Walk We'd Done...

However, Gone Were The Heavy Dark Clouds That Had Brought Heavy Rain...

This Stretch Was Lined With Private Residences, Many Of Which Had Built...

I Thought These Were The Cutest Sun Loungers I'd Ever Seen, All...

This Paddle Boat Was Available For Rent, I Could Only Think How...

It Appears That This Area Wasn't Private, The Fellow Had Pulled In...

Not All The Buildings Along The Waterfront Were In Good Condition, This...

For Some Reason Anil's Back Was Bothering Him So I Offered To...

We Passed This Memorial To A Man Who Perished In WWII, Anil...

The Old Road Joined The Highway Shortly After It Reached The Church...

Anil Headed For A Café While I Took A Peek Inside, The...

I Was Really Impressed With The Stunning Mural Behind The Altar, I...

I Find That Few Churches Use Blue In Their Decorations, This Stone...

After Our Lattés We Headed Home, Here You Can Get An Idea...


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Here’s some of what the Lonely Planet – Montenegro chapter Bay of Kotor has to say about the Dobrota:

“Dobrota

Dobrota is effectively a residential suburb of Kotor, starting north of Kotor’s Old Town and stretching along the shoreline for 5km. Despite the close proximity to its famous neighbour, it retains a distinctive feel. While Kotor looks inwards from its walls, Dobrota gazes out to sea.

Foreign investors have renovated many of the decaying palazzos, some of which are much grander than those you’ll find in Perast or Kotor. Soak it all up with an evening sashay along the elegant paved boardwalk tracing the water’s edge.

St. Eustace’s Church

Cavernous St Eustace’s dates from 1773, but has a 19th-century steeple and a little walled graveyard. It houses a valuable collection of paintings, including by Bellini and baroque master Carlo Dolci. Opening hours are iffy: you may be able to get in on Sundays.”

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

After a relaxing first day in our beautiful apartment in Dobrota, at the northern edge of Kotor, we decided to go for a long walk to the little church to near where what I imagine was the original road along the way meets the modern-day highway. The receptionist at our apartment-hotel told us it was about 4km and we decided that a walk there and back was just what we needed.

After the hundreds, no indeed thousands, of steps we’d climbed up and down in Dubrovnik, our knees would welcome a long, quiet stroll on level ground. The heavy rain clouds that we’d seen on our first afternoon in Kotor were gone and the forecast showed nothing but sunshine for the coming week. We should have rejoiced at this change in the weather, but we’ve become quite used to this happening wherever we travel.

Over the many years that we’ve wandered the world, we find ourselves arriving at a new destination only to be told ‘you are very lucky indeed, this weather is not at all usual for this time of year’. It’s happened so regularly that we don’t get too discouraged when the forecast looks ominous. We just wait a few hours and time and time again, we are rewarded with near perfect skies.

However, we’ve also noticed that it tends to rain when we are leaving a place; and I mean pouring rain. We’re hoping that won’t be the case in Montenegro as we are planning on hiring a driver to take us to the capital, Podgorica, after we’d stayed a week and we want good weather there as well.

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