Italy's Adriatic Coast travel blog

Remains of Greek/Roman Amphitheater

Remains of nearby Greek/Roman building

Roman ruins

Roman ruins

Roman ruins

Roman ruins

Christian church nearby Jewish Ghetto

Kosher artichokes

Other kosher foods

Narrow alleys

Fountain

Narrow alleys

Entrance to a Palace

Courtyard of Palace, highly decorated

Courtyard of Palace, highly decorated

Water fountain made of old (unused) sarcophagus

Courtyard

Decorations in courtyard

Decorations in courtyard

Fountain just outside Jewish Ghetto

Narrow alleyways

Buildings all built together from different times

Main square in Jewish Ghetto

Beverly enjoying a cappuchino

Remains of an apartment that was cut in half to make way...

Markers of old wall around Jewish Ghetto

Jewish Synagogue

Jewish Synagogue

Jewish Synagogue

Jewish Synagogue

Jewish Synagogue

Menu

Fall decorations

Sample meal

Display of artichokes

Roman ruins

Roman ruins

Plaza d' Venezio

Plaza d' Venezio

Plaza d' Venezio

Plaza d' Venezio

Plaza d' Venezio

Ruins of the Forum

Ruins of the Forum

Ruins of the Forum

Ruins of the Forum

Ruins of the Forum

The Colosseum in the background

"The Wedding Cake" - Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II, 1st King of...

Details of the Wedding Cake

Details of the Wedding Cake

Details of the Wedding Cake

Details of the Wedding Cake

More beautiful church domes

Front side of Parliament


Today, Luca our guide, takes us on a walk to the Jewish ghetto. The dictionary definition of ghetto is a part of a city in which members of a minority group live, typically as a result of social, legal, or economic pressure. Of course during World War II when Jews were forced into certain parts of a town or city and were called ghettos, it became a negative word. In Rome, Jews were forced to live in this area, but then later were free to live anywhere and the walls and gates were torn down. Now this Jewish Ghetto has become a very trendy place to live.

Just outside of the ghetto, we see the outside remains of an Greek/Roman amphitheater. It continues to amaze us how these centuries-old buildings still remain.

Then we walk around the ghetto itself. You'll see our photos of the area and the Christian area right outside of it. We eat traditional Jewish food for lunch - fried artichokes and some kind of wonderful fried fish.

After lunch, we walk to the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument. It is monument built in honor of the first king of a unified Italy located in Rome in 1885; so it is relatively new!! It is fondly called "the wedding cake". It is so elaborately designed that it is hard to describe and even take pictures of. Doug did his best.

Behind the wedding cake is a wonderful view of the ruins of the Forum, government buildings of ancient Rome and the Colosseum.

Sorry about the photos yesterday. This program wouldn't let be label each photo. I'll try again tonight.

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