East Coast and Florida travel blog

Threshing Brook, or a little piece of it, as we wandered along...

Dynamite decided he needed to sit with Mike, and since a lap...

Follow the orange line, this is where we walked from the highway,...

On the banks of the Annapolis River, looking south at the Pitre...

One of the apple orchards we walked by, note the nice apples!...

The long walk back to the bus, if you look really hard...

The plaque at the Melanson Settlement, a National Historic Site of Canada

Beautiful scenery driving along the Annapolis River as we returned to the...

The main road into Digby, really steep, but a pretty town

Digby Harbour with a falcon (?) standing guard (he's on the logs...

Parked in our last spot in Canada for almost 7 months

Michelle taking a picture on the shore of Trefry's Lake, where the...

Despite the look on his face, Mike is enjoying the bench by...


For the past two nights we stayed with Ange and Nicole who are chefs at the Noodle Guy in Wolfville (the restaurant has a 4.9/5 in reviews for it's food). We spent the afternoon walking through their forest backyard and following Threshing Brook, a protected brook that meanders over part of their property. A very peaceful, sunny day in a beautiful setting. Then they cooked us dinner and we shared it with the ladies and Ange's parents. It was amazing. We had a wonderful rest but it was now time to move on with our trip.

After a day off from travel we packed up the bus and moved onto our next day of adventure. Our first destination of the day was the original homestead of Michelle's family here in Acaidia. We had a copy of an old map, from 1707, which we followed. We abandoned the bus on the side of the road and walked down some old farm lanes, through apple orchards and across some hay fields. We figured we were standing on land that Michelle's family worked some 350yrs ago. We wandered a bit, took in the views standing on the shores of the Annapolis River and tried to appreciated what life must have been like before all these Acaidians were rounded up and deported to various points in North America, in what was called 'The Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation or Le Grand Dérangement'. Today apple farms fill the fields, (nearby Berwick is Nova Scotia's apple capital) and Michelle 'may' have grabbed a few apples from the trees that 'may' have been ready for picking. And we 'may' have enjoyed the juicy, crispy, succulent fruit when we got back to the bus.

Our next destination was the homestead of our son-in-law's family, the Melansons were also one of the first Acaidians in the area. Here, the National Park Service actually had done some excavation work and had erected information boards along a path through where the large settlement had been back in the late 1600's. One interesting note: when one of the ships, the Pembroke was on its way to North Carolina taking some of the Melanson family members away, the crew was overpowered and the Melansons escaped to shore and worked their way up to Quebec.

All this, going back in time, through history, searching out Michelle's past is our version of the TV show 'Who Do You Think You Are'. It was a wonderful experience, an unexpected bonus on our trip. Then, getting back on the highway, we got a text from our son-in-law (Mitch) who informed us that his Aunt and Uncle owned a restaurant in Digby, so off we went for lunch farther down the road. The seafood at 'The Shoreline Restaurant' was wonderful and really hit the spot; the Seafood Chowder, Bacon Wrapped Scallops and Fish & Chips were soooo good. Then attached to the restaurant was a gift shop run by Mitch's cousin, so we chatted with her and shared some stories. As we walked back to the bus we noticed that some of the war memorials along the town streets listed Melansons as fallen veterans. The Pitres were on the other side of the river, in another town, so they weren't listed here.

One side note about Digby. The town is built on some very steep hills. The roads downtown come very close to what we experienced in San Fransisco. Driving the 40' bus up and down the streets became a real challenge. Though Mike had visions of doing the Steve McQueen stunt driving of getting the bus to fly through the air, he knew better. Despite the steepness of these streets, he managed quite a feat, not bottoming out the bus once!

The Acaidian experience was chronicled in a poem 'Evangeline' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The 50 pages he wrote describe some of the life and hardships of the people during the Great Upheaval. Today, the name Evangeline is everywhere including the highway we were now on as we drove on to Yarmouth to catch our next ferry in the morning.

This is our last night in Nova Scotia, the Maritimes and Canada, we must be heading south!



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