Canadian Maritimes / Summer 2015 travel blog

Daylight view of the graveyard, we did a nighttime ghost tour.

Daylight view of the graveyard, we did a nighttime ghost tour.

Daylight view of the graveyard, we did a nighttime ghost tour.

Reconstruction of the original French Port Royal outpost.

Acadien re-enactor.

Plan of the stockade

Commander's quarters.

Interior of the stockade.

Kitchen

Common hall

Interior of the stockade.

Fort Anne, after British improvements, circa 1740.

Fort Anne, after British improvements, circa 1740.

Most of the walls has disappeared and grassy mounds remain.

Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal

Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal

Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal

Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal

Bins of lobsters are unloaded onto an automated conveyor belt.

Lobsters on the belt are instantly weighed and automatically sorted.

Very large, cold, 8 foot deep storage pool, containing 200,000 lobsters

Big one!

Another big one!

Really big one!


Annapolis Royal was the first capital of Acadia and Nova Scotia. On the Bay of Fundy and with a natural sheltered harbor, it was once the center of French Acadia. Founded as Port Royale in 1603, it was conquered by the British in 1710 and renamed Annapolis Royal. Eventually the capital was moved to Halifax on the Atlantic which was more strategically located and a better staging point for military operations and commerce.

Our visit started with a graveyard ghost tour starting at sundown on the day of our arrival. An historical orator told us stories about the graveyard residents and wove the history of Annapolis Royal into the stories.

There is a large colonial fort here and many historic buildings. We started with a tour at the site of the original French outpost of Port Royal where an historically accurate reconstruction of the original has been built. Later the French colonial capital of Port Royal and a fort were built on the other side of the Annapolis Basin, which became the British city Annapolis Royal and Fort Anne. We toured in what became a perfect Nova Scotia summer day.

The next day, before we departed, we visited a lobster fishery processing plant. Lobsters are brought from the nearby wharves, docks, and harbors to this plant to be sorted, stored, and shipped to retail outlets like restaurants, groceries, and lobster pounds. Lobsters are shipped in stack-able plastic racks with individual compartments for each lobster. They removed, weighed, sorted, and then placed in similar racks and then submerged in a 38 degree, 8 foot deep pool for storage. Lobster season here runs April to July and September to November, and varies from district to district within Nova Scotia. About the size of an Olympic swimming pool, on the day we visited it contained about 200,000 lobsters, enough to tide them over for supply in the off-season.

A very interesting operation to see. We planned a group supper of individual main courses and pot-luck side dishes, so Janet and I bought fresh scallops, which Nova Scotia is also famous for. Others in the group bought a mix of lobster or other fish, depending on tastes and preferences.



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