Kapoors Year 9A: Paris/Sicily/Myanmar/Nepal travel blog

As No House Was Big Enough To Accommodate Us In Delhi, It...

Funny How Most Of The Men Chose To Wear Blue During The...

And Most Of The Women Chose Shades Of Red And Orange, I...

Once The Two Groups Got Together, A Toast Was Made To Arun's...

Later That Evening There Were Smiles All Round As Anil And Adia...

Arun's Sons Presented Him With A Smartphone For His Birthday, We Almost...

It Was A Terrific Party, Eventually We Got Around To The Cake...

Ever The Gentleman, Arun Presented The First Piece To His Long-Suffering Wife...

The Best Surprise Of All Was When We Got The Honoured Couple...

The Following Morning, After Breakfast All The Adults Assembled For A Farewell...

Then We Added The Children And Asked A Staff Member To Take...


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KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

We planned our trip to Myanmar in conjunction with an important visit to India. Anil’s brother was due to turn 70 years of age on November 23rd and his two sons, Chetan and Puneet planned a major celebration for him. Arun was the first person in his family to complete 70 years of a healthy life and we all wanted to gather to wish him many, many more happy years to come.

Anil’s father, Prem Kishen Kapoor had died suddenly on December 24, 1980 after many years of complications from Type II diabetes. He was only 64 when he died. Kamla Kapoor was very close to reaching her 70th birthday, but she died on June 5, 1995 from complications from three decades of severe asthma. She would have turned 70 on November 15, 1995.

So, as you can see, the family had good reasons to recognize Arun’s 70th birthday as being very special indeed. Because of the timing of our Myanmar tour, we weren’t able to reach Delhi on his actual birthday, so the party was scheduled for just a few days later, once everyone had arrived. Our daughter Adia was able to attend as well because she was coming to India for a month-long Iyengar Yoga training course in Pune before the birthday party.

By the way, the ’70 not out!’ is a reference to a score in the sport of cricket. This phrase is used when a game of cricket ends and one or both of the two batsmen is still ‘in’, ‘not out’. I’ve had a great laugh over the years learning the quirky terms used in this very British game.

You might want to click on this link for a laugh: Cricket Explained

We had a terrific two weeks in Delhi before it was time to return to Canada. We had been away a very long time, touring France, Italy, Malta and Myanmar but we managed to squeeze in a week in Kathmandu, Nepal before we left Asia. I had long been keen to visit Nepal, but there had never been time to do it before in conjunction with a trip to see family in India.

In hindsight, it was a good thing that we went when we did, because four months after our visit, was Nepal was hit by a massive earthquake that left 9,000 people dead and over 22,000 injured. Kathmandu’s historic centre was flattened.

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