Winter trip to Australia 2011/12 travel blog

1967 Bush fire memorial park in Snug with steel girder frame in...

The tahune metal walkway up in the forest canopy

Snug bay where the families backed their trucks with their families in...


Our last full day in Tas was another bright and breezy one and visibility was much better than the previous day. The sea was back to its blue sparkling best and we had a clear view of Dennes point on Bruny from our chalet.

In 1967 there had been terrible bush fires in this area around Hobart to the SW and 62 people lost their lives and hundreds of homes were burnt down. Evidently Snug itself was burnt out and looked like it had been bombed. People saved themselves and their families by driving backwards as far as possible into the sea to keep cool. On the seafront at Snug now there is a memorial park with people’s accounts of the fire which is quite moving. Bush fires are an inevitable and necessary part of regeneration of the eucalyptus forests but this last big fire was obviously extreme driven by the hot winds from the deserts of Australia in the north.

After a slower start to the day we drove SW to Tahune Forest reserve in the Hartz National Park area. The drive is round the Huon river estuary which is similar to the Tamar estuary of Launceston in the north of the island except this one grows a lot of fruit as well as grapes for wine with particularly beautiful cherries that are sold everywhere at the moment. The Tahune forest reserve has an aerial walkway 20m to 50m above ground in the canopy of the trees and with a ranger explaining everything was very interesting and answered a lot of our questions about the different bush forests we had seen in our fortnight in Tas. It was a good round up of the whole holiday… particularly when we saw a Lyre bird undignifyingly running across the road with its tail bedraggled behind when we were on the way out from the reserve!



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