Piloting the Dutch Star travel blog

EARLY MORNING PAIR OF MOOSE CROSS AS WE TRY TO EXIT THE...

 

 

 

BEAUTIFUL GOLDEN EAGLES ARE THE MORE COMMON EAGLE IN THE PARK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LONE CARIBOU ON A DISTANT RIDGE

 

 

 

WHAT A TREAT TO SEE A BULL MOOSE WITH SUCH A RACK

 

 

 

 

A SCUFFLE AMONG BEAR SIBLINGS AS MAMA LOOKS ON THEY ARE ABOUT...

 

RARE VIEW OF DAHL SHEEP ON LOW LANDS CROSSING FROM ONE MOUNTAIN...


TUNDRA WILDERNESS TOUR AND RILEY CAMPGROUND: As we drive out of Teklanika, we are pleased to see two moose near the road. The Tundra Wilderness Tour includes the added feature of a camera and video displays (like on an airplane); the bus driver frequently hones in on spotted wildlife so you can find it more easily, or watch the video if the location is awkward for you. We were a bit disappointed that they use a video camera rather than a stronger scope; it was an interesting experience, but in our judgment overall not worth the added expense. The driver, Mary Jane, nevertheless is an exceptionally knowledgeable naturalist and very helpful. The day proves to be almost as good as our first day for viewing Denali as well, so Jim gets some good pictures. And we see even more grizzly bears (10 unique bears, 12 sightings) as well as more caribou and an even closer, larger Bull Moose than we had previously seen. Jim also gets a great picture of a golden eagle (the head is golden rather than white like a bald eagle, and the juvenile he captures has white beneath its wings). We purchase the DVD to share since it is video footage of the trip and has some introductory information as well—then head for Riley Campground for a few days of catching up on the journal, e-mail, laundry, and sleep. We had planned to stay only one night, but the campground sites are surrounded by wonderful pines and we learn of more ranger programs we’d like to see. We discuss why we would want to hurry since this is such a nice place so are pleased to be able to extend for two more nights. We visit the Murie science and learning center (named after the naturalist who studied wolves and showed that they should be left alone as they are critical to the life cycle of many; for example, many wild animals feed on their kills). We hear several ranger talks at the new visitor center and in the campground, learning about: the earth hammocks and permafrost polygons that make walking in the tundra so difficult; how Denali is influenced by activity all over the world, including the dirty cooking fires in India and China as well as pesticides used in many places. We were reminded that the red-beaked, white Arctic Tern that bonked us on the head (defending its nest) as we rafted travels the farthest—back and forth between the Arctic and Antarctica. We ration our milk once we see they charge $5 for a half gallon at the local grocery. We enjoy riding our bikes along the nice bike trail from Riley Campground to the visitor center and back, meeting a jogger on the way who indicated he had just seen a moose near the forest edge—but we did not see it. We also meet a nice couple from Connecticut (Betsy and Rob) who started their four-month trip a month before us (Rob retired the same day I did). Jim manages to upload pictures for the journal but then the computer screen seems to have gone dark and since my computer isn’t programmed to link via the blackberry, we’ll look for a good internet site and a computer wizard to fix his when we can.



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |