Kevin and Becky RTW 2005 travel blog

Blue Spotted Ray

2 Cowries

School of Oriental Sweetlips

Reef Octopus showing he is agitated (as he has changed colour and...

Same Octopus before he saw us (in his normal colour)

Stone fish on ocean floor

Baby Yellow box fish

Stripped leg spiney lobster

Banded Sea snake (highly poisonous but so laid back that it's no...

Kevin scuba diving - Similand Islands

Powder Blue Surgeon fish

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

4-5 metre Manta Ray gliding by us !

Tiger tail sea horse

Cuttlefish

Cuttlefish

Zebra Moray Eel

Large Jelly fish

Large Jelly fish

Masked Porcupine fish

Masked Porcupine fish

Toby

Blue star coral

Common Porcupine fish

Common Porcupine fish

Scorpion fish

Nudi Branch


The live aboard boat was small but there were only 12 guests and 3 instructors so it wasn't overly cramped. Our room on the other hand was only 6 ft sq for four people so you can imagine that was kind of confined.

Thankfully the first couple of days we got time to relax on the secluded white sand beaches of the Similan Islands during our surface intervals between dives. We did four dives every day, fourteen in total including two night dives covering the Similan Islands, Surin Islands, Koh Bon, Koh Tachai and Richelieu Rock, the furthest site quite close to Burma waters and definitely the most beautiful.

We were actually the most experienced divers on the boat which was nice and that confidence in the water seemed to make us both advance further during the trip so we were pretty good by the end of it even if we do say so ourselves!

We didn't get to see a whale shark but did see a 5 metre Manta Ray which was absolutely incredible and pretty rare in itself. It was a very surreal couple of minutes there underwater watching it glide by so huge but so gracefully. It swam right past us, about 10-15m away once then came back the same way, turned 270 degrees around us before heading back out into the blue.

We got to see most other smaller stuff and are now quite good at spotting ourselves and can name many now thanks to the professional dive instructors on the boat.

We soon realised how little chance we actually have of seeing whale sharks as the crew running this live aboard have been doing it the season since November and have yet to see one. There was one in the vicinity once but they missed it by 15 minutes so it just goes to show you have to be very lucky and be in the right place at the right time as well as looking in the right direction.



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