Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

We've arrived at the fair!

It's sprinkling on & off but there' still a few folks on...

Susan has her funnel cake, Larry's waiting on his!

Step right up & try your luck!

Moving on through the covered bridge. Won't be bringing our 5'er through...

It's been in use since 1883, except during a couple of safety...

Arriving at 'Knome Village'...How interesting is this!

I didn't bring my Nikon today, only my point & shoot. Disappointed...

Check out the dishes on dining room table on top!

So this is where those dwarfs live!

Alot of work went in to attention to details...

One last shot...There was so much more!

Across the street is the house...

Big foot? guarding it!

Nice use of hubcaps...

Off to our left...

In front, to left...

Forks, forks, and more forks!

Susan got permission to come onto the property & to explore the...

Spoons, spoons & more spoons!

This is Susan's favorite piece. It's a kaleidoscope and the plant spins...

A portion of the garden path is glass bottle bottoms...Nice!

Windchimes & the grim reaper??

There is stuff everywhere. Wire insulators make a good garden trim for...

Even the downed tree trunks need decorating, right?

Cool bird..Wonder how long it takes to create this stuff?

Love the shovel yard art!

A fine collection of tools etc...

A spoon dragon! How cool is that!

How does a guy go about creating all of this????

A knome, riding a dragon...Ride'em cowboy!!! LOL

A closer view, in case you are thinking of creating one too!

Yard decor...

Very nice glass display...

A ferocious lion eating a pink bunny...Really???

I like these two guys!

I think this glass piece was my favorite...What an interesting place! Wish...

Moving on to the Tulip Trestle...

I read that the graffitti helps to save the metal from rusting...

It's really up there at 157 feet!

You can watch the 1+minute video if you'd like to see the...

Time to head home, it was a great day!


Moving on from Terre Haute, we traveled a short distance to the small town of Bloomfield, Indiana. We have extended family there and enjoyed a short visit with John & Susan. John recently retired from the Sheriff's department & Susan is the current county clerk. The town had a small fair going on, so after parking our rig we joined in the festivities. We enjoyed our 'tacos in a bag' and a funnel cake for dessert, mandatory fair 'lunch', don't you think? Fresh apple cider topped it off.

After checking out a few of the rides and the vendors we decided to visit a local home in the area known as 'Knome Village'. Now this is one interesting place for sure! A local retired engineer apparently has lots of free time and a great imagination to go with it. He has gone across the street from his home, into the woods, and decorated fallen trees with 'Knome furnishings'. Very imaginative for sure! My niece Tiffany would have loved it!

Back across the wooded road is his amazingly differently decorated home. This man has managed to take materials you & I would discard and build, glue, solder some very interesting pieces. They are hanging & sitting everywhere! It would have taken 3 hours to do this place justice and I took a ton of pics. But I'll share just a few of the 'highlights' in today's post. The pieces made with forks and spoons were probably our favorites. Well done!

Moving on, we visited the Tulip Viaduct, a 2,295-foot long railroad bridge.. It is 157 feet above the ground at its highest point. Work on the bridge started on May 22, 1905, when a ground breaking ceremony was led by Joe Moss. It was finished in December of 1906 and is the longest rail trestle in the United States and the third longest bridge of its kind in the world. It has 18 towers for support.

The original cost of the viaduct was $246,504 which is an estimated $6,202,420.10 in 2012 dollars. This massive structure was built using mostly Italian immigrant laborers. The laborers were paid up to 30 cents an hour, which was considered to be an excellent wage in 1906. The viaduct was constructed by Indianapolis Southern Railway and secretly financed by Illinois Central Railroad. It was built for train travel to transport coal from Greene County mines to large cities, such as Chicago. Passenger trains once traveled across the viaduct, but passenger service was discontinued in 1948. I found a short video of the train crossing on 'youtube' if you'd like to see it in action. Just click on the blue link:TULIP TRESTLE

After visiting the fair, the village & the Tulip Trestle we headed over to Worthington to enjoy the American Legion's annual fish fry. We arrived in plenty of time to meet some family & friends of John & Susan before our meal. Nice folks! In fact, most everyone we've met in Indiana has been very pleasant and friendly. Small town living is great!

Tomorrow we move on to Kentucky where we'll spend a few days exploring Louisville & Lexington. We plan to visit Churchill Downs & the Kentucky Derby Museum. As well as the Louisville Slugger museum. So stay tuned for more adventures and thanks for stopping by...



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