Kapoors Year 7: Europe/Ecuador/Peru travel blog

The Last Day Of Our Drive Dawned Windy And Wet, It Made...

We Found A Drive-Through Coffee Bar, Who Wanted To Get Out Of...

After Crossing The Big Bridge Over The Columbia River, We Stopped For...

It Was Surrounded By Some Fine Examples Of West Coast First Nations...

And Even The Tourist Signs Were Colourful And Creative

Hours Later We Reached Port Angeles - Can't Imagine What Inspired This...

I Was Keen To Re-Visit The Dungeness Spit And Was Surprised To...

The Spit Is A Massive Sandbar Sticking Out Into The Strait Of...

Captain George Vancouver Hailed From Dungeness, Scotland And So It Was Named

When We Were Here The First Time, There Were No Grasses Growing...

We Looked Out Across The Strait To Canada, There's Sunny Skies In...


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BACKGROUND

Here is an excerpt from the Lonely Planet - USA chapter Pacific Northwest:

Larger than Port Townsend but less historically interesting, Port Angeles is a solid fishing and lumber town which, by right of geography, acts as the main headquarters for the nearby Olympic National Park. The visitor center is right next to the ferry terminal.

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

It had been nine days since we met Ajay and Neeta at the bus station in Los Angeles and we had enjoyed almost perfect weather since then. However, for our last push up the Pacific coast we faced miserable wet weather, for most of the long day’s drive. We knew that we had more than eight hours of driving time ahead of us, not allowing for any stops, so we got off to an early start.

At first I was a little disappointed not to have sunny skies for our last day on the road, but I have to say, it was interesting to see the wild coastal scenery with low clouds and gusty winds. This is what it looks like for most of the year, and the contrast from the previous day couldn’t have been more dramatic.

We stopped at Tillamook for hot lattés and didn’t even get out of the car. A cute little windsock shaped like a parrot riding a bicycle was whirling in the strong wind. We drove for another long stretch and stopped for hot soup and sandwiches in a cute little waterside restaurant in Raymond, WA.

Before our last push to the Olympic Peninsula, we stopped at a Trader Joe’s on the outskirts of Olympia to pick up a long list of items sent to our by our daughter Adia. She also suggested that we pick up some wine at Trader Joe’s as she’d found some inexpensive red wine there on an earlier trip that was as good as anything she had made at one of the do-it-yourself wine stores in Victoria.

I searched for the items on the list while Anil and Ajay checked out the wine. Anil noticed that almost everyone was grabbing a case of red wine that was on sale for $30 per case. He picked one up too just for the heck of it, and then selected a couple of bottle of wine we’d had before. I don’t know how we managed to fit all the groceries and wine into the already stuffed Volvo, but we only had a couple of hours to Port Angeles where we were stopping for the night.

After checking into the hotel and unloading the car, we set off to see the Dungeness Spit, a long finger of sand that reaches five miles out into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It’s one of the longest sand spits in the world. I couldn’t believe how much the area had changed since we were there in the early 90s. A National Wildlife Refuge had been established and there are groomed trails that lead visitors down to the beach.

We didn’t stay long as it seemed I was the only one really interested in seeing the spit; the others were hungry and tired from a long day of driving. We enjoyed a Vietnamese meal at a small restaurant near our hotel and headed to bed shortly afterwards. We knew we could have a leisurely morning as we had booked the ferry to Victoria for mid-day.

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