Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

It's a beautiful start to our day!

We've arrived at Cape Kiwanda...

My honey enjoying the view of the Chief Kiawanda Haystack...

Looking down the beach to our left...

The surfers were out in full force today, looks like fun!

Coming in for a nice landing!

Moving on...

The North Trail at Cape Lookout...

It's a bit gray but still so pretty...

Getting closer to the Three Arch Rocks...

A closer look at one of the arches...

Welcome to Cape Meares....

Heading to the lighthouse...

View through the trees,as you can see there are patches of gray...

The Cape Meares Lighthouse...

There is a small giftshop inside a small lighthouse, lol...a bit pricey...

A little different perspective as we make our way to the Octopus...

46 feet in circumference!

It really is pretty cool, don't you think?

Last shot of Three Arch Rocks...

All kinds of traffic on PCH!!! Nice...


Today we drove the Three Capes Scenic Loop, a 35-mile byway off U.S. 101 between Tillamook and Pacific City, known to be one of the most scenic areas on the north coast. We started our day at Cape Kiwanda State Park. Cape Kiwanda is the smallest of the three capes but not necessarily the least interesting. There is an interesting sandy protrusion named Cape Kiwanda, and one of the grandest and photogenic haystack rocks on the entire Oregon coast, Chief Kiawanda Rock. They say if you look closely, you will see the profile of the Chief with his face pointing south and his "ponytail" being the loop on the north side of the rock. Really???

The climb to the top of the cape offers a view of the coastline including Haystack Rock. Continuing north over the hill, we passed through Tierra Del Mar, a small community of homes lining the pristine beach. This area offers a great view of the north side of Cape Kiwanda. There were several turn outs and beach access for pedestrians and vehicles.

The scenic route then took us on a winding drive that moved inland in spots and then to Cape Lookout, another state park, which has camping facilities near the beach. Trails and viewpoints were abundant in this area as well. We started down one lovely trail & within a few yards the raindrops started so we chose to head back to the truck. I'd rather stay dry this early in the day even if I have to view all of this amazing scenery from the truck. Wimp???? LOL

Next stop, Netarts Bay and the quaint community of Netarts considered one of the best coastal locales for clamming and crabbing. About 3 miles on up the road is the turnoff to Oceanside, a small coastal village that is a popular stopping place with vacationers. Just offshore from Oceanside is Three Arch Rocks. Three Arch Rocks was declared a National Wildlife Refuge in the early 1900s by President Theodore Roosevelt.

Turning left from the bay, the route climbed up through forested hills toward the entrance to Cape Meares State Park. Within easy walking distance from the Cape Meares parking lot is the Octopus Tree, a Sitka spruce that sends eight very large limbs (until one was whacked off during a storm in the early `90s) into the sky. The tree was featured in Ripley's Believe It Or Not for years. After checking out the tree we took the paved walkway to the Cape Meares Lighthouse, a stumpy specimen that is the smallest lighthouse on the Oregon Coast, standing only 38 feet high. But size isn't important here as it stands on a 200 ft high cliff, more than making up for its own lack of height. I love the variety and number of lighthouses located all up & down this beautiful Oregon coast.

Tomorrow we hope to visit south of our current location. The weather will be a determining factor in how much we actually get to explore. It was gray & a bit drizzly on & off today and a large front is expected to move in tomorrow. In fact, we're supposed to get pounded for three or four days. Bummer....I say "rain, rain go away, come again some other day!" LOL......



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