Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Bushy flats at beginning of loop...

The view up here is amazing!

Isn't this amazing?

Blood Geyser...

A closer look for you...

Moving along the boardwalk way up top...

It's a beautiful day...

First glimpse of the mud pots...

Caught that bubble bursting! And a small 'plop' too!

Another bursting and a big 'burp' too!!

Ok, ok, I know, I'm just fascinated with boiling mud! So cool!

I'm moving along now :)

Milky blue pools, truly an artist's palette here...

Heading back to the truck, look at the size of these tree...

Heading home, had to stop for this beauty...

Pretty sky...

The moon is already out...

Beautiful! Hope you enjoyed our time here in Island Park & Yellowstone,...


Our final day of touring Yellowstone finds us at the Artists Paint Pots, a group of over 50 springs, geysers, vents and especially mud pots. They exhibited varying shades of blue, grey and brown, and have a range of different textures. Our literature told us the behavior changes during the year depending on the amount of subterranean water. We took the easy 0.6 mile loop trail through partly wooded land, mostly level apart from a short climb and descent across the hillside overlooking the basin.

The boardwalk path crosses bushy flats to the start of the loop around the hot pools, at the base of the north side of Paint Pot Hill. Turning right, the first features are a number of gently simmering milky-blue pools, edged by reddish sulfur deposits. Next are various smaller vents, as the trail climbed a short distance up the hill though new growth lodge pole pine trees and turns east, past perhaps the most unusual pool in the area - a big creamy-brown mud pot with several churning vents behaving slightly differently owing to the varying consistency of the mud. This part of the path is high enough to overlook many square miles of the surroundings, from the hot pools below, across the Gibbon River Valley towards more distant active areas on the far side of Gibbon Meadows.

The hillside has other small pools and steam vents, before the trail descends and meets two forceful pools (Blood Geyser and Flash Spring), both constantly bubbling, creating much steam, and occasionally staging a proper eruption. Blood Geyser gets its name from the bright red-orange sulfur deposits surrounding the vent. The end of the loop section of the trail is reached in another 250 feet, after a few other equally steamy pools. There are plenty more hot springs nearby, some visible through the trees, and a larger area lies out of sight on the far side of Paint Pot Hill (Geyser Creek Group), though numerous warning notices caution against leaving the official path. We can certainly understand those warnings! I don't know exactly how far a person would sink and don't want to find out!! It's a steaming hot pot for sure but a wonderfully different, unique and special place to spend a couple of hours....:):)



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