Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Standing on the bridge admiring the cabin & waterwheel across the river...

Cool structure & waterwheel to create electricity...

Love the sound of the wheel, posting a short video of it...

Looking up the river to our right...

Walking the path across the river that leads to the cabin...

Darn, closed for the season...

That includes the outhouse dear! If it is an outhouse?

Peering through the windows into kitchen/bath area...

You can tell the wood workmanship is nice...

A few of his tools?

4'11" Johnny Sack & his companion...Bet he was an interesting guy...

Back on the bridge on the other side of the spring, enjoying...

Seagull coming in for a landing...

Well, are you gonna feed me or not? LOL

The mallard had a nice perch...

Rainbow trout swimming under the hen...

Muskrat having a little snack, note the front feet...

Soon there were two...

Heading back home, beautiful skies...

Movie Clips - Playback Requirements - Problems?

(MP4 - 1.76 MB)

Johnny Sack structure & waterwheel...Sounds nice & peaceful

(MP4 - 2.50 MB)

A little preening going on here!


Located just 28 miles outside the West Entrance of Yellowstone is the Johnny Sack Cabin and Big Springs. We visit this little gem every time we are in this area. It's located just up the road a bit from Mesa Falls (I covered the Falls in an earlier post) and visiting both of these locations would be a great way to spend part of a day. The spring is beautiful & interesting, as is the story of Johnny Sack.

In 1929, Johnny Sack leased a small tract of land from the United States Forest Service and began building his log cabin at Big Springs. Little did Johnny know when he first acquired the choice building site, his home would become a landmark one day discussed in the United States Congress. Due to its unique location and picturesque setting, Johnny’s cabin and nearby water-wheel have long been one of the most photographed sites in Island Park.

The cabin took approximately three years to complete, as Johnny worked primarily with hand tools — saws, draw knives, scrapers and planers. Johnny built a small structure and water-wheel at the edge of the springs to harness the power of the springs and create electricity.

From his cabin overlooking Big Springs, the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River, Johnny welcomed visitors from throughout the world who stopped by to look at his charming cabin and nearby water-wheel. Much like today, visitors were welcomed in and shown about the unique structure.

The cabin is open to the public from mid-June through mid-September, and visitors are invited to visit and see firsthand the unique craftsmanship of one of Island Park’s early settlers. Unfortunately, it is closed for the season so we had to peer through the windows as best we could. This is the third time I have arrived too late in the year to go inside. Ah well, something to look forward to next time...

Born in 1884, Johnny came to the United States with his parents and four brothers and sisters from Germany when he was six years old. The family settled in South Bend, Indiana, and Johnny eventually made his way west to the newly established community of Ashton, Idaho. Along with his brother Andy, Johnny arrived in Island Park by passenger train during a blizzard in June, 1909. The brothers’ ambitious goal was to raise cattle on Henrys Lake Flat. After years of working for various ranchers and serving time in the military, Johnny began making his living building furniture and cabins.

Standing just four foot, eleven inches tall, Johnny leased his cabin site, one of more than 30 cabin sites surrounding Big Springs, for $4.15 per year. Using craftsmanship that reflected his early training with the Studebaker Wagon Corporation, Johnny created beds, chests, tables and chairs from hundreds of pieces of pine paneled with bark inlay. Even his lamp stands, magazine racks and ceiling fixtures were cleverly wrought from odd-shaped limbs, knots and pine cones.

As Big Spring's lone winter resident, Johnny would rely on cross country skis and snow shoes to travel many miles each week to pick up his mail and visit with friends at Mack’s Inn or Pond’s Lodge. Claiming “a woman would just put rugs on my varnished floors and draperies over my picture windows,” Johnny never married. After his death in 1957 the cabin became the property of Johnny’s two sisters. They later sold the cabin to Elberta and Rudy Kipp, who made it possible for the building to be opened as an interpretive center in 1980. Lucky for us...

Producing over 120 million gallons of water each day, Big Springs is a Natural National Landmark, one of the 40 largest natural springs in the world. The springs create the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River which travels across Fremont County creating spectacular scenery at Upper and Lower Mesa Falls. The water originates from the Yellowstone Plateau and with a constant temperature of 52 degrees is home to rainbow trout, muskrats, ducks, moose and other critters. It is not unusual to see osprey and eagles dive for a meal of fresh fish from the springs. Today we enjoyed the ducks, muskrats, trout & even a seagull! Now where in the world did he come from? You can purchase food to feed the critters & they wait for you to appear on the bridge before making a mad dash up the river. Love it, too fun!

P.S. Will post on Yellowstone next time...not enough time today!



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