Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

My honey is very intent today...

There are other RV'ers out here on I-89...

A really pretty area...

Arriving at the border...

We crossed this bridge...

Over the Connecticut River, beautiful river...

Pretty skies & a bit of color...

Stopping to stretch our legs a bit, the water is cold, brrrrr...

Munching on an apple, this was the view out our door &...

Moving on down the road this is one of the 7% grades,...

This magnificent view is off to our right, wish there was a...

Another of the 8% grades with no room for error!

Can you tell how fast we are dropping? Larry is doing a...

There really is no way to share this beauty with you, but...

We got to pullout for this shot...

A bit closer for color inspection...

Last shot for today, God's palette is so beautiful!


Wow, we had such an awesome drive today. Leaving Vermont we crossed the state line into New Hampshire about 1pm. We traveled on about 6 roads today with just a small portion being interstate. A bit of a tough haul for Larry as we meandered mostly down 2 lane highways with beauty all around, but two 8% & two 7% grades to deal with! Throw in a bunch of Sunday drivers & quite a few motorcycle riders & heavy concentration was a must. A tow haul package & a LOW gear were also musts! LOL

We've now been in the Green Mountain Range & the White Mountain Range, (Rt. 112, the Kancamagus Highway (locals call it the Kanc), which offered 37 miles of stunning mountain scenery through the White Mountain National Forest), through Woodstock arriving just outside of Conway. We are here to stay for a couple of days to enjoy the surrounding area. It is just beautiful with all the lakes, streams & the changing colors.

We all enjoy the colors of autumn leaves. Did you ever wonder how and why a fall leaf changes color? Why a maple leaf turns bright red? Where do the yellows and oranges come from? To answer those questions, we first have to understand what leaves are and what they do.

Leaves are nature's food factories. Plants take water from the ground through their roots. They take a gas called carbon dioxide from the air. Plants use sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide into glucose. Glucose is a kind of sugar. Plants use glucose as food for energy and as a building block for growing. The way plants turn water and carbon dioxide into sugar is called photosynthesis. That means "putting together with light." A chemical called chlorophyll helps make photosynthesis happen. Chlorophyll is what gives plants their green color.

As summer ends and autumn comes, the days get shorter and shorter. This is how the trees "know" to begin getting ready for winter.

During winter, there is not enough light or water for photosynthesis. The trees will rest, and live off the food they stored during the summer. They begin to shut down their food-making factories. The green chlorophyll disappears from the leaves. As the bright green fades away, we begin to see yellow and orange colors. Small amounts of these colors have been in the leaves all along. We just can't see them in the summer, because they are covered up by the green chlorophyll.

The bright reds and purples we see in leaves are made mostly in the fall. In some trees, like maples, glucose is trapped in the leaves after photosynthesis stops. Sunlight and the cool nights of autumn cause the leaves turn this glucose into a red color. The brown color of trees like oaks is made from wastes left in the leaves.

It is the combination of all these things that make the beautiful colors we enjoy in the fall. And Larry & I are certainly enjoying! Wish you were all here to see God's magnificent palette with us!



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