Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

It was a beautiful day for a drive...

Love the clouds today...

We've arrived...

Arriving at the cemetery, check out all of the birds there to...

Nice entrance area...

We strolled through the property, looking at many of the markers...

As you can see, it is a fairly large cemetery...

This 20 foot high granite obelisk honors those that dies for the...

The roads have crushed oyster shell in them...

Moving on down to the waterfront...

One of the lovely homes in the area...

The trees are heavily laden with 'spanish moss'...

It's quite soft...full of bugs though so we got rid of it...

Horse drawn wagons are available for touring...

Time to head home, it was a nice drive for today, tomorrow...


Today we took a lovely drive to Beaufort. Chartered in 1711, it is the second-oldest city in South Carolina, behind Charleston.

Beaufort is located on Port Royal Island, in the heart of the Sea Islands and Lowcountry. The city is renowned for its scenic location and for maintaining a historic character through its impressive antebellum architecture. The city is also known for its military establishments, being located in close proximity to Parris Island and a U.S. Naval Hospital, in addition to being home of the Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort.

The city has been featured in the New York Times, named "Best Small Southern Town" by Southern Living, named a "Top 25 Small City Arts Destination" by American Style, and a "Top 50 Adventure Town" by National Geographic Adventure.

We drove around a bit before stumbling on Beaufort National Cemetery, a United States National Cemetery encompassing 33.1 acres. It is a wonderful site that is draped with live oaks and Spanish moss. The cemetery’s plan is unique among other national cemeteries of the Civil War-era because of its landscape, which was laid out in the shape of a half wheel with roads forming spokes from the “hub” at the entrance. Today, more than 14,000 veterans lie at rest in the cemetery. Four commemorative monuments are located on the cemetery’s grounds. A granite obelisk standing 20 feet high honors those who died for the Union. Eliza McGuffin Potter, a woman who cared for soldiers in Beaufort’s military hospitals, erected the monument in 1870.

The original interments in the cemetery were men who died in nearby Union hospitals during the occupation of the area early in the Civil War, mainly in 1861, following the Battle of Port Royal. Battlefield casualties from around the area were also reinterred in the cemetery, including over 100 Confederate soldiers. It became a National Cemetery with the National Cemetery Act by Abraham Lincoln in 1863. The remains of 27 Union prisoners of war were reinterred from Blackshear Prison following the war.

Beaufort National Cemetery now has interments from every major American conflict, including the Spanish-American War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Gulf War. On May 29, 1989, nineteen Union soldiers of the all black Massachusetts 54th Infantry, whose remains were found on Folly Island, South Carolina in 1987, were buried in the cemetery with full military honors. Members of the cast of the film Glory served as honor guard. The cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

After leaving the cemetery we drove a bit through the residential area admiring the lovely homes & tree lined streets. We've been so blessed with great weather since arriving in Georgia. I say Georgia because that's where we really are in our minds. It's just that the Passport America park where we are staying is 9 miles outside of Savannah, in Hardeeville, just across the South Carolina state line. It's actually the closest private RV park to Savannah and many folks miss it because they are looking at the Georgia PA listings. So you might keep that in mind!

Tomorrow we take a 90 minute trolley tour in Savannah. Looking forward to that....



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