Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

On our way this morning on I-40...

It's a great 'Smoky' day!

Jenny & Don...

Time to eat, we're starving!

Jenny, looking up family info for us dealing with Cade's Cove, interesting!

Check out all the various gourds on a barrel out front of...

Jenny would like Santa to bring her this Tennessee Rocker!

All too soon it was time to be on our way...

This sign was out on the highway where we made our turn...

We stopped to check this out too...

We have arrived...

Memorial out front...

Side view of the property...

Information..

I always like to read this stuff, so I assume you do...

We didn't realize he did as much politically...

Supposedly the original site...

Hubby is sitting on a rocking horse 'thingy'...

View inside cabin to the left...

And to the right...

There is a corn crib and demonstration areas on site...

Taking a walk along the riverbank...

Along the riverbank near the campground...

Back on the road heading home we noticed this lovely red barn...

We think it's tobacco?

Doesn't it look like tabacco hanging to dry, way over on the...

Nice place, pretty tree too!

Another barn down the road, same product we think...

Heading home, it's getting late...

Almost there, had a great day!


Today we met our good friend Jenny Johnson & her hubby Don for lunch in Johnson City. We first met Jenny in September 2006 in Couer d'Alene, Idaho. She was living in Spokane, Wa at the time & drove to Couer d'Alene to play tour guide for us. She had lived in the area for many years & really knew her way around! We had a great day & continued to keep in touch. Well, she now lives in Mountain City, Tn & contacted us to let us know we were only a couple of hours away. So of course we had to meet up before leaving the area. It was so good to see her again & we also got an added bonus. A few days earlier we took the most well known driving tour in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Cades Cove. It turns out that Jenny is 5th generation to most of the folks in the Cove. She brought her family history book along & oh my, it was so interesting. It really brought it all to life as we listened to her tell family stories. I haven't posted on Cades Cove yet but I know you will find it very interesting.

Jenny suggested we stop at Davey Crockett's State Park on our way home so we did. It took us off I-40 onto US Hwy 321 which was a much prettier way back home too! Situated along the Nolichucky River, the park consists of 105 acres centered around the traditional birthplace of legendary Tennessee frontiersman, soldier, and politician Davy Crockett (1786-1836). The park includes a replica of Crockett's birth cabin, a museum, and a large campground. We, like many other visitors I'm sure, were surprised to see the birthplace cabin situated on a flat river terrace rather than a "mountaintop," as Crockett's birthplace was described in the 1950s-era song, "The Ballad of Davy Crockett."

After reading the informational boards we learned that according to Stonecypher family lore, Samuel Stonecypher, who purchased the land in 1824, dismantled the Crockett cabin and used the logs to build a small house nearby that became known as the Stonecypher cabin. The Stonecyphers claimed that the footstone of the original Crockett cabin, however, remained at that cabin's original site. Sometime in the 1880s, the footstone was adorned with an inscription reading, "On this spot Davy Crockett was born Aug 17 1786." In the 1950s, the Davy Crockett Birthplace Association used the logs from the Stonecypher cabin to build the Crockett cabin replica. The inscribed footstone was placed in front of the cabin replica, where it remains today. Since the Crockett cabin's original design was unknown, the DCBA modeled the cabin after a late-18th century log cabin located elsewhere in Greene County at the time. In 1967, the Limestone Ruritan Club placed a large, round monument near the replica cabin. The monument wall contains the names of all 50 U.S. States engraved in stone native to each state. Demonstration areas have been set up behind the cabin to emulate Appalachian frontier life. The park's facilities include campground sites, picnic pavilions, a swimming pool and a public boat launching ramp. Several short hiking trails follow the riverbank and bluffs.

We also read that Davy Crockett grew up in the hills and river valleys of East Tennessee, where he gained a reputation for hunting and storytelling. After rising to the rank of colonel in the Lawrence County, Tennessee militia, Crockett was elected to the Tennessee state legislature in 1821. In 1827, Crockett was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for the first time. As a congressman, Crockett vehemently opposed many of the policies of President Andrew Jackson, most notably the Indian Removal Act. Crockett's opposition to Jackson's policies led to his defeat in the 1835 elections, prompting his angry departure to Texas shortly thereafter. In early 1836, Crockett joined the Texas Revolution and died at the Battle of the Alamo in March of the same year. Thanks largely to 19th-century playwrights and 20th-century film makers— who often attributed to Crockett brazen acts of mythical proportion— Crockett grew to become one of the most well-known folk heroes in American history.

According to his own recollections, Crockett was born "at the mouth of Lime Stone, on the Nola-chucky river." Crockett recalled that his father, John Crockett, had moved to the Tennessee area from Lincoln County, North Carolina years before. Crockett's father appears in Washington County court records as early as 1778, and appears in Greene County court records throughout the 1780s. Crockett related an event from his very early childhood in which his brothers almost drowned in the Nolichucky trying to paddle over "a fall in the river, which went slap-right straight down." This may allude to the shoals located along the Nolichucky immediately downstream from the mouth of Big Limestone Creek. Crockett goes on to say that shortly after this incident, his father "removed and settled in the same county, about ten miles above Greenville.

After leaving the cabin we drove down to the RV park to check things out. 88 sites, with 15 or so having 50 amp service. Nice & quiet, like the park itself. We enjoyed a short walk along the riverbank before finally moving on toward home. This was an enjoyable stop, no entrance fee & no visitors today except us. We loved that part, lol! I wouldn't drive hundreds of miles out of my way to visit, but since we were in the area we certainly enjoyed the stop. Tomorrow we move on to North Carolina. We're actually on our way to South Carolina but understand the Biltmore Estate is a must see on the way. So that's the current plan.



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