Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

The Museum, opened in June 1956...

Loved the amazing work on these mocassins...

Used to hold the umbilical cords of newborn children?? Really?

J. W. Dear traded with the Sioux for many years before opening...

This is the oldest known photo of Camp Robinson...

Dignitaries representing both sides of the Black Hills Treaty Council at Red...

Actors from a 1913 movie about the 1890 fight at Wounded Knee...

Twelfth Cavalry Mascot "Pup" surrenders, too cute!

Eighth Cavalry on manuevers, wow glad I wasn't there!

On their way to the Philippines in 1910...

Enlisted Men's dinner, Christmas Day 1889, menu of roast beef, mashed potatoes,...

Troop K, Tenth Cavalry, football team...

Cartridge belt made for Carter P. Johnson by Ute Indians. Capt. Johnson...

Calamity Jane is sworn in as a government scout while Wild Bill...

In 1940 alone, Ft Robinson processed 12,000 riding & draft horses for...

During this time 1000-2000 horses were on hand, far below the 12,000...

The flagpole was relocated in 1930...

Army troop transport gliders after the mock attack in 1943...

Inspection for a member of the K-9 corps, perched atop his shipping...

Wow, that's alot of kennels & snow too!

About 1700 dogs were kenneled or in training at one time...

This obstacle course was called 'Crazy Horse Run'...K-9 agitator's taught dogs to...

Hurray, the WAC's have arrived, well at least some thought so!

Women's Army Corp detachment...

Afrika Corps uniform worn by Dietrich Kohl...Prisoners kept National clothes but wore...

Info sign on the prisoner's of war...

Pic of some of those prisoners...

Interior of a guard's barrack, pretty sparse...

More info for you, we didn't realize there were PW's here...

PW cooks, August 1944...

Bonnie, checking out a wall of interesting information...

Wonder if they used ear plugs???

Dedication of the first Nebraska Historical Society branch museum, 1956...

On December 30, 1878 Camp Robinson was redesignated as a fort...

Saddle & rifle used by soldier's...

Liked this information, interesting...

The main form of entertainment was visiting the saloon...Enlisted men were restriced...

So many men took advantage of the store & the saloon, Crawford...

Dress coat worn by trooper Warren T. Waldron, First Cavalry 1898...

Interior of one of the 1887 cavalry barracks...

The third & final room upstairs, I just read in here!

Sorry about the glare, too many windows, amazing coat & hat quite...

This would be interesting to see...

Whew, time to put our feet up for a break!

Hope you enjoyed our little tour, time to gather our things and...


As I mentioned in my last post Brad & Bonnie joined us for breakfast this morning before heading out for our days adventure. We explored most of the fort property and then went up the road to a turnoff which took us along the base of the buttes and to a few small lakes. We passed the buffalo herd along our way and the longhorn's as well. Afterward we cut back across the highway to the now gone Red Cloud Agency. Informational signs indicate where it once stood.

The Red Cloud Agency was an Indian agency for the Oglala Lakota as well as the Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho, from 1871 to 1878. It was located at three different sites in Wyoming Territory (present-day Nebraska), before being moved to South Dakota. It was then renamed the Pine Ridge Reservation.

In August 1873, the Red Cloud Agency was moved from the North Platte River to the White River, near what is now Crawford, Nebraska in the northwest corner of the present-day state. The following March, the U. S. Government authorized the establishment of a military camp at the agency site. Home to some 13,000 Lakotas, some of them hostile, the Agency was a source of tension on the Great Plains.

The camp was named Camp Robinson in honor of Lt. Levi H. Robinson, who had been killed by Indians while on a wood detail in February. In May, the camp was moved 1.5 miles west of the agency to its present location and was renamed Fort Robinson in January 1878. Fort Robinson played a major role in the Sioux Wars from 1876 to 1890. The Battle of Warbonnet Creek took place nearby in July 1876. Crazy Horse surrendered here with his band on May 6, 1877. Later that year, he was fatally wounded while resisting imprisonment on September 5. A historic plaque marks the site of his death.

In January 1879, Chief Morning Star (also known as Dull Knife) led the Northern Cheyenne in an outbreak from the agency. Because the Cheyenne had refused to return to Indian Territory, where they believed conditions were too adverse for them to survive, the army had been holding them without without adequate food, water or heat during the severe winter to try to force them into submission. Soldiers hunted down the escapees and killed most over the next several weeks. The event marked the end of the Sioux Wars in Nebraska.

In 1885, the 9th Cavalry Regiment, nicknamed the Buffalo Soldiers, was stationed at Fort Robinson. This was an all-black unit. During the next several years, the fort was enlarged and military training was a major activity. From 1889-1890, Second Lieutenant Charles Young served here and later was reassigned to the regiment. A black pioneer officer who had graduated from West Point, he was the highest-ranking black in the US Army throughout his career and achieved the rank of Colonel. From 1887-1898, the fort served as regimental headquarters. The post gymnasium and theatre, built in 1904, provided entertainment for the soldiers.

In 1919 at the end of World War I, Fort Robinson became the world's largest Quartermaster Remount Depot. It was used as a breeding and training center for horses and mules for the military. In addition, stallions owned by the military were used to breed with local stock to improve it. During World War II, the fort was the site of a K-9 corps training center. Later it was used to hold a German prisoner-of-war camp.

After 74 years of military use, Fort Robinson was transferred to the United States Department of Agriculture in 1948 for use as a beef cattle research station. The USDA closed its research station in 1971.

A new chapter of Fort Robinson's history began in 1955. The US Army excessed a portion of the fort, which was acquired by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission to be used as Fort Robinson State Park. The following year, the Nebraska State Historical Society opened the Fort Robinson Museum at the fort and the fort was then declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960.

There are many ways to spend a day at the fort. Horse drawn tours are offered to help get acquainted with the park. You can enjoy a morning on horseback, an open-air Jeep ride among the buttes or one of the popular nature tours aboard the Fort Robinson Express. There are more than 22,000 acres of Pine Ridge scenery and the park has it's own small buffalo and longhorn herds.

On a hot day like today, 97 degrees, we wouldn't have minded heading for the indoor Lindeken Pool! We settled for a rootbeer float at the General Store instead! The Fort Robinson Restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily and we certainly enjoyed our breakfast there this morning very much. Great food and reasonable prices... All in all, beautiful scenery, lots of fun things to do and an area filled with great history so we have to give it an A++++...

P.S. I had way to many pics to share in just one post so had to split them into two. I hope you will find them to be quite interesting. I know many of my family members & friends won't be traveling to this area anytime soon, so hopefully this will give them, and you, a bit of the flavor of the amazing history that took place here.



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