Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

As you can see, it is still very pretty in lower Michigan...

Our new home for the next few days...

Arriving at the Henry Ford Museum...

The view if you look up...

And entering after you pay there are multiple directions & areas to...

We had a tv similar to this when I was a child,...

Do you remember hearing about Orson Welles' hair-raising broadcast of "War of...

And remember this 1952 Wienermobile, an inspired mix of kitsch, nostalgia &...

"Sweepstakes" built in 1901 by Ford, carried him to victory in the...

1965 Lotus-Ford, Indy would never be the same, Jim Clark dominated, leading...

There were lots of different heating stoves to see, beautiful...

Aultman-Taylor, a 12-horsepower steam traction engine, offered for sale in 1885...

People have to stoop over to pick tomatoes, ouch, hence the harvester...

Just stuff...

Silk stockings? Ok, I would have brought them my stockings!

Isn't this armchair cool?...

An interesting shoe making display...

And women's rights, a big deal for us, right ladies!

In 1955 Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a...

This is the actual seat she sat in, wow!

Don't know if you can tell, but all the parts of this...

I assembled mine, & Larry & this nice young man laughed at...

Neat stuff, fans, bicycle, sewing machine, park bench etc...

I love this, I don't remember it, guess I am too young!

Major changes affected the silver & pewter trade-1785-1815...

Fast food was on the rise...

Check out this old photo, notice the cars!

Isn't this diner cool!

Larry felt right at home...

Note the prices...

Check out these gas pumps...

You can trust your car, to the man who wears the star!,...

This is a gas tanker, amazing...

1951 Schwinn Black Phantom, complete with balloon tires, spring forks & electric...

1907 Harley-Davidson, air cooled, 1 cylinder, 3 horsepower, 145 lbs. Original Price...

In 1943, Charles Lindberg presented this Model 20 Excelsior motorcycle to the...

Ross Chariot, one of the few surviving horse-drawn vehicles from the 1700's...

Concord Coach, circa 1865, seated 6-16 passengers or mail, 4-6 horses required...

The Hansom Cab, from 1830"s England, used mostly in New York as...

1941 Lima "Allegheny", one of the largest, most powerful locomotives ever built,...

The President is shot!...

Info sign...

Abraham Lincoln's chair...

1959 Volkswagon Westfalia Camper, $2737 Original Price,

I love their advertising brochure!...

Info sign...

This trailer was given to Charles Lindberg to use, he later returned...

1928 Graham Brothers "Nomad" house car, originally mounted on a Ford Model...

1949 18-foot Airstream trailer, this rivited trailer gained a reputation as the...

And last but not least for this post, do you remember Burma...


We arrived in the small town of Belleville about 25 miles west of Detroit tired, hungry & just plain worn out! We traveled 192 miles again today, we do not like moving at the pace we are. However, you can't have it both ways, so I will try to stop whining & comment that we are so blessed to be enjoying our lives the way that we are! It is certainly our choice to head East for the fall season. And we wouldn't change a thing...

We located an RV park in Trailer Life that is actually the Fairgrounds/RV Park Combo. It is not bad, not our best site ever, but nice green lawn & not at all crowded over this holiday weekend. There is no one on either side of us, so we have lots of room to spread out also. And, it is only about 15 miles back to Dearborn which is where we plan to spend the next 2 days, at the Ford Museum.

Auto manufacturer Henry Ford was a man ahead of his time. Although he didn't invent the automobile, Ford believed that a car that everyday people could afford would be a huge success. He was right and the company he started still exists today.

But Ford was also ahead of his time in another way. He could have collected the finest and most expensive art in the world. But instead he collected commonplace things, like toasters, farm machinery, kerosene lamps, and steam engines. Ford felt that these everyday objects told a truth not written about in history books. Today, educators call these items "primary sources."

In order to display his collections (which he began collecting as far back as 1906), Ford founded the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village (originally called the Edison Institute, in honor of his friend, Thomas Edison), the world's largest indoor-outdoor history museum. Ford wanted his museum to be a place where people could see how their ancestors lived and worked. The 13-acre museum and village celebrates the accomplishments of American innovators, such as Ford himself, Thomas Edison, the Wright brothers, George Washington Carver, Noah Webster, and others.

The Edison Institute was dedicated by President Herbert Hoover to Ford's longtime friend Thomas Edison on October 21, 1929 - the 50th anniversary of the invention of the incandescent light bulb. Of the 260 people in attendance, some of the more famous were Marie Curie, George Eastman, John D. Rockefeller, Will Rogers, and Orville Wright. The dedication was carried on radio with listeners encouraged to turn off their electric lights until the switch was flipped at the Museum.

The museum collection contains many rare exhibits including Thomas Edison's laboratory, the Wright Brothers' bicycle shop, and the Rosa Parks bus. There's even a Dymaxion House conceived & designed in the late 1920's, this was supposed to be a solution for the need for a mass-produced, affordable, easily transportable & environmentally efficient house.

Motor homes are represented, too, by Charles Kuralt's last "On the Road" vehicle and a trailer Henry Ford once loaned to Charles Lindbergh. There's also a classic "silver bullet" Airstream trailer parked next to a row of Burma Shave signs ("Within this vale - Of toil and sin - Your head grows bald - But not your chin - Burma Shave"), and a vintage Volkswagen Westphalia camper. The oldest RV on display was a 1929 model made by the Covered Wagon Co. of Mt. Clemens, Michigan, the first company to make motor homes. By the end of the 1930s, 300 such companies were making them. And you thought Winnebago's were something new!

Not surprisingly, the Henry Ford Museum does a smashing job displaying cars. There's the only existing 1896 Duryea Motor Wagon, which was the first production car in America, and five presidential limos, including the one in which John Kennedy was assassinated in 1963. There's a 1952 Oscar Mayer Weinermobile and lots of other one-of-a-kind models.

We kept wandering, marveling at agricultural implements, airplanes, locomotives, robots, and an unending supply of remarkable inventions. There's a bicycle built for ten, and a mannequin displays a pair of motorized roller skates patented in 1958. They had a 1 horsepower, air-cooled, single cylinder motor, and the inventor had dreamed of outfitting messengers in Manhattan with personal wheels. Really, you will not get bored at the Henry Ford Museum. The second you think you've seen it all, you'll pick up an old- fashioned telephone receiver and hear Thomas Edison telling you to "Keep at it!"

I have hardly scratched the surface here. I haven't even mentioned some of the Museum's most famous mementos. On display are Thomas Edison's last breath, which is preserved in a test tube and the theater seat in which Abraham Lincoln was sitting when he was shot. There's even a hand written letter to Mr. Ford from Clyde Barrow himself (of Bonnie & Clyde fame).

If you have never been to the Henry Ford Museum, go. The museum is a destination to an incredible journey. You'll need 2 days time, the 1st for the museum & Imax, and the 2nd to see the other half of Henry Ford's legacy, Greenfield Village. We plan to do it tomorrow. Can't wait!

P.S. I took over 325 pictures today! Obviously I can't post them all & I will try to be as selective as possible. So, I am going to put the automobiles in as a seperate picture post so that you may have a break in viewing. Sorry, but there is no other way to share this wonderful museum with you. I hope you enjoy your tour!



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |