Kapoors Year 9A: Paris/Sicily/Myanmar/Nepal travel blog

We Passed This Very Cute Vehicle On Our Way Through The Town...

What A Site! What A Sight! A Huge Greek City Was Built...

For Over Two And A Half Centuries This City Was One Of...

We Had The Pleasure Of Being Almost Completely Alone Among The Ruins,...

I Say We Were Almost Alone Because We Stumbled Upon A Couple...

I Imagine They Too Appreciate The Weather And The Peace And Quiet...

Many Of The Carvings, Some As Impressive As The Parthenon Marbles, Are...

The City Was Destroyed By The Carthaginians in 409 BC And Eventually...

There Are Several Shops Near The Entrance Gates To The Site

This Gives Us An Idea How Much This Site Is Visited During...

We Hadn't Seen This Distinctive Sicilian Pottery Anywhere We've Visited Already

The Colours And Designs Are Quite Striking, Cute Handles For Lifting This...

I Particularly Liked The Designs That Are Shaped Like Fish And Other...

Alas, Too Many Travel Miles Ahead Of Us To Be Able To...

Most Of The Pottery Was Coloured Bright Red And Blue, This Fish...


@@@@@@@


BACKGROUND

Here’s some of what the Lonely Planet – Italy chapter on Sicily has to say about Selinunte:

“The ruins of Selinunte are the most impressively sited in Sicily. Try to visit in spring when the surroundings are ablaze with purple, yellow and white wildflowers. The huge city was built in 628 BC on a promontory overlooking the sea, and for two and a half centuries it was one of the richest and most powerful in the world. It was destroyed by the Carthaginians in 409 BC and finally fell to the Romans in about 350 BC, at which time it went into rapid decline and disappeared from historical accounts.

The city’s past is so remote that the names of the various temples have been forgotten and they are now identified by the letters A to G, M and O. The most impressive, Temple E, has been partially rebuilt, its columns pieced together from their fragments with part of its tympanum. Many of the carvings, particularly from Temple C, are now on display in the archaeological museum in Palermo. Their quality is on a par with the Parthenon marbles and clearly demonstrates the high cultural levels reached by many Greek colonies in Sicily.

No visit to Selinunte is complete without a walk along the beach below the city, from where there are marvelous views of the temples.”

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

@@@@@@@


Share |