Summer 2011 - Steve, Kathleen, Bailey and Martha's Travel Journal travel blog

Sunflower

Close-up of sunflower florets

Lily

Close-up of stigma and anther

Flower photos from garden tour

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Lupine seed pods

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Huge cabbage in one garden

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Flowers with bee in flight

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Photographer's assistant with tripod

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Flowers with bee

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My favorite assistant

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Lily with red spikes

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Lupine in stages of flowers, green seed pods and black dried pods


July 21 – 24 – Recuperation and More Mt. Desert Island GardensI took the week off to recuperate and am now a new man.

We took the LL Bean bus to Bar Harbor to see Midnight in Paris, a girl flick, while we dined on cheese and garlic pizza. The theater was full and we almost had to use the sofas and TV tables at the front of the room – not our best choice.

On Sunday, the Southwest Harbor Library sponsored a garden tour of properties in and around Southwest Harbor. The first and last of 6 were the best. I took a couple of flower photos that are attached.

Tomorrow, we will again meet our Friends of Acadia friends for more bog work. Our leader, Anna, informed us that we have about two more days of crib making to finish the walk It is much cooler this week so a plus to my hiatus is that we missed the 90F temperatures of last week.

RV Maintenance – The upper slide seal is loosened and dropped down leaving an air gap that I have been putting off repairing. I used drops of Gorilla Glue in the seal pocket, after spritzing with water the frame lip which fits into the seal pocket. Water activates the glue. Hopefully the glue tacks will hold the seal until we return to Florida.

For those of you who are wondering why sunrises and sunsets have a reddish color is the following description:

Why do sunrises and sunsets have a reddish tone from Glenn Randall, a professional nature photographer: http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/how-to/shooting/the-rarest-light.html

It helps to know a little bit about atmospheric optics, the science of how sunlight interacts with our atmosphere.

The sun emits light at all wavelengths, which means all colors. When sunlight strikes our atmosphere, however, it begins to interact with air molecules in a process called Rayleigh scattering. Blue light scatters much more strongly than red light, which is why the sky is blue on a clear day.

The amount of scattering is dependent on the distance the light travels through the atmosphere. At noon, the path length through the troposphere (the dense layer next to the Earth) is relatively short, roughly 11 miles or so. Enough blue light scatters out of the beam to make the sky blue, but the remaining light is still a mixture of wavelengths that we perceive as white.

At sunrise and sunset, however, sunlight takes a much longer path through the troposphere because the light is traveling obliquely through the atmosphere, along a tangent to Earth's surface, rather than along a path perpendicular to Earth's surface. For example, if you're photographing an old barn in Kansas at sunrise, the path length through the troposphere is roughly 235 miles. At sunrise or sunset on a clear day, most of the blue light scatters out of the beam. The reddish light passes straight through, giving you warm light on your subject.


Have a great week.




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