Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Started our day with just a bit of fog, but it's warm...

The Heceta Lighthouse at a distance...

Those black dots in the water are sea lions, and so are...

A closer look...

On the rocks. bottom right, they are way down from the ledge...

Isn't the water beautiful today?

A closer view of the lighthouse...

Moving along the view continues to be beautiful...

Good t-shirt weather, yippee!

A stroll on the beach for this shot...

Cape Perpetua Scenic area info...

A reasonable blow today...

Nice info board...

These guys were interesting to watch, they are facing forward, zipping along,...

I liked this lighthouse...

NO, I can't imagine!

Thought this was cool!

Moving on...

Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, re-lighted 1996...

This guy seemed to be checking it out as well!

Yaquina Bay Bridge...

Larry thought the guys would find this interesting...

Liked the pelicans on the distant rocks...

The sun is ducking behind the clouds...

Guess it's time to head for home...

Look quick, it's the Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse...

We're losing our daylight, so pretty...

Last shot for today, perhaps my favorite...


Our trip yesterday took us down the Florence-Eugene Hwy. It was a lovely drive with the same amazing fall colors we've enjoyed the past couple of weeks. We traveled along the 110 mile Suislaw River enjoying the view as we made our way west to the coast, destination Florence. The skies cleared as soon as we left the Portland area which made for an easier drive for Larry. It's never fun to pull our 5'er in the rain!

We arrived at the Lakeshore RV Park about 5 miles south of Florence about 6pm. We've stayed here in the past, and even though it's nothing fancy, we like the owners and the $14.50 a night price for full hook-ups. Makes a great home base. When traveling the Pacific Coast Hwy 101 in a rig, there are not many turn-outs large enough to accommodate that size. So it's much easier to stay for a few days and do day trips, one day north and one day south.

In addition to the fabulous views, sea lions and neat little towns, there are also eleven lighthouses standing along the Oregon Coast, each with a unique history. Two of them, Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse and Pelican Bay Lighthouse, were created by lighthouse enthusiasts. We stopped to visit three of them today.

Our first stop, Heceta Lighthouse. Built in 1894, this operational lighthouse is located about 12 miles north of Florence, Oregon and one mile north of the Sea Lion Caves. This lighthouse is about 205 feet above sea level and stands 65 feet high. The light emitted is the most powerful on the Oregon Coast, signaling ships up to 21 miles out to sea. It is named after a Portuguese explorer, Don Bruno de Heceta, who sailed the Oregon Coast in 1775. Legend has it that the lightkeeper's residence is haunted. From the 1890's to this day, lodgers and visitors claim "strange things" continue to happen within the house. The lighthouse and buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.

We chose to skip the Sea Lion Caves, due to the price of entrance. We've seen them in the past so we settled for a view of them from the top of the road. They were in the water and on the beach today instead of on the rocks where they normally hang out, so we were especially glad we didn't pay to enter the cave.

Our next stop was the Yaquina Bay Lighthouse. Built in 1873, this operational light is located 3 miles north of Newport, Oregon. The lighthouse stands 93 feet high, about 162 feet above sea level and is the tallest lighthouse on the Oregon Coast. The purpose of coast lighting was to position lights so that their beams would meet and cross each other. Therefore, ships would never be without sight of a light. Yaquina Bay Lighthouse (1871-1874), was replaced by Yaquina Head Lighthouse which emitted a much stronger light and obsoleted the older lighthouse. In 1966 Yaquina Head Lighthouse was automated and the light now flashes every 20 seconds and can be seen about 20 miles.

The fourth 'lighthouse' we got a quick view of is known as Cleft of the Rock. The tower is a replica of the 1898 Fiddle Reef Lighthouse, which was a lighthouse on Vancouver Island long ago. Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse stands 110 feet above the Pacific Ocean. This lighthouse is not open to the public, and can only be viewed from mile post 166 on Oregon's Highway 101. Just after passing this mile post marker, look down off the northwest side of the highway, and you will see James Gibb's home and lighthouse. Gibbs decided to build this private lighthouse as part of his home. It is located on the cliffs just south of Yachats. We did not take the pic, as the view happens so quickly there is no time to get one. And no turnout in the area. But it's still fun to look for it as you get in the area.

The weather was perfect today! Somewhere in the mid 60's I'd guess. We were totally comfortable in jeans and t-shirts. We'll be heading south tomorrow on a day trip. We are meeting grandson Ryan for lunch in Coos Bay, and will continue to travel as far as Bandon. We love Bandon, so we'll see you there!



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