Larry & Lee Ann's Journey travel blog

Arriving in Hope to visit the tunnels...

Specifically the Coquihalla Canyon Park...

This sign didn't inspire much confidence...

But we're on our way none-the-less...

The river is coming into view...

Pretty, very clear...

Near the entrance to tunnel one...

An informational sign for you...

Plenty of moisture around the tunnels...

A look up before we enter...

Here we go...

Near the end of tunnel one...

A look down before we enter tunnel two...

This one seems taller...

But a view to the right first...

Tunnel three coming up...

View to our left below, the water has really worked on these...

And a neat shot back through the canyon...

I like this shot...

There is plenty of green around all of the tunnels...

Yep, I'm here too!

The blue of the water is nice...

Lowered in a small, woven basket...yikes!

Last tunnel...

Looking back now...

We continued on for about an additional mile, just enjoying the walk...

Moss is heavy on many of the trees...

The path is narrowing and getting tougher, time to turn back?

These particular rocks are so worn, they appear white now...

It's been a beautiful day weather-wise, we're actually a bit warm by...

More cool rocks in the river, guess I'm into rocks today!

Larry paused to take it all in just once more...

On our way out of the park, we noticed this contraption blocking...

And we stopped to check out the Kawkawa Lake at the bottom...

Driving home we had views like this...a neat end to a cool...

Movie Clips - Playback Requirements - Problems?

(MP4 - 2.34 MB)

Othello Tunnels...

(MP4 - 2.68 MB)

Video 2...

(MP4 - 3.19 MB)

Video 3...

(MP4 - 3.03 MB)

Video 4...

(MP4 - 2.31 MB)

Video 5...

(MP4 - 166 K)

Soory, 3 videos were too long! Will make them shorter next time...


Today we visited the Coquihalla Canyon Park, more commonly known as the Othello Tunnels. The Othello Tunnels were built from 1911 to 1918 to complete the Kettle Valley Railway near where Hope, BC is situated today. They were cut through solid granite to allow the railway to span the 300-foot-deep Coquihalla Canyon. Plagued by washouts and rock slides, the railway line was closed in 1959.

The trail that leads through the four tunnels that once supported the track cost $300,000 to lay in 1914. Almost all of the work was done by hand; hence the enormous expense. This is still considered the costliest mile of railway track in the world. After the trains stopped running in 1965, Hope residents removed the wooden ties and smoothed out the rail bed into a broad recreation trail, now part of the Trans Canada Trail system that opened in 2000.

Along the route we developed a new appreciation for the term tunnel vision, particularly in the middle of the longest of the four passageways, where light barely seeps in through each end. As we stepped into the coolness of the shafts, currents of soothing air wafted over us, propelled along by the rushing motion of the nearby river.

Short spans of bridges link one tunnel to the next, allowing tantalizing glimpses of the Coquihalla Canyon below. We stopped frequently to take it all in. The brochures advised to bring flashlights and to wear water proof shoes. The flashlights certainly were needed, however, tennis shoes would not have been a problem as the seepage was minimal. It was cooler this morning, in the low 40's, so we started our day with coats. But the farther we walked, the more we warmed up, and we were really wishing they were back in the truck!

This was an interesting experience and we're glad we came. I'm not sure we would re-visit, but if you are in the area, it's worth a couple of hours for sure....Tomorrow we visit Vancouver and Stanley Park



Advertisement
OperationEyesight.com
Entry Rating:     Why ratings?
Please Rate:  
Thank you for voting!
Share |