Canadian Maritimes - Summer 2015 travel blog

Cape Anguille light house

Rose Blanche light house

recycled

Rose Blanche drive

Rose Blanche drive

Rose Blanche drive

Rose Blanche drive

Burnt Islands

Burnt Islands


Our final campground in Newfoundland is in the banana belt, the southwest corner of the province. The Anguille Mountains, just north of where we are camped, are famed for their winds. At their worst they blew a few cars of a narrow gauge railroad completely off the tracks. We were glad that we drove through on a more temperate day. We enjoyed a day without planned activities in the warm sunshine, but are guessing that this isn’t the tourist mecca that our previous stops were. It has some of the best farmland in the province. We are here to board the ferry back to Nova Scotia, a considerably shorter ride than the overnighter we took here. For some unknown reason, it will feel be good to be back in land that is ultimately connected to our home. I’m not sure why I feel that way, because we have really enjoyed our time here. Despite all of my whining and complaining about rain, fog, and cold. I have taken more photographs here than the rest of the other provinces put together. Newfoundland is scenically beautifully and has a richer, more unique culture than the other Atlantic provinces. It takes a special kind of person to survive and thrive here.

We drove to Rose Blanche lighthouse, built from granite quarried nearby. It didn’t appear like any of the other lighthouses we have seen here. It looked so solid and massive, we were surprised that it had to be restored. The nearby town of Isle aux Morts or Island of the Dead got its name because of all the marine disasters that happened in the treacherous waters offshore despite the light house. It was not unusual for fishermen to find remnants of wrecks in their nets, sometimes including corpses.

The town of Burnt Islands was fun to visit. It was festooned with pennants, the sort that car dealers hang in their lots. Each home had a “Welcome Home” sign with the name of the family living inside. Some folks were decorating floats and as we drove over the causeway; we wondered if we could get stuck there during the parade. It was all rather mystifying until I googled and discovered that many Canadian towns have “welcome home” holidays where they encourage residents who have moved away to return for a reunion - a bit like a high school homecoming, I guess.

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